DMaPProcess
DMaP

How to Design a Logo

Word count: 1320

A logo is a graphical element (ideogram, symbol, emblem, icon, sign) that, together with its logotype (a uniquely set and arranged typeface) form a trademark or commercial brand. Typically, the logo design should be created for immediate recognition.

The logo is one aspect of a company’s commercial brand, economic or academic entity, and its shapes, colors, fonts, and images usually are different from others in a similar market. Logos are also used to identify organizations and other non-commercial entities.1

A logo reflects a business’s commercial brand through the use of shape, fonts, colour, and / or images. A logo aims to inspire trust, recognition and admiration for a company or product.

Logo Design Process

  1. The Design Brief
  2. Research and Brainstorming- Client competition, trends in the market, what sets the client apart, the history of the business, the future, the current brand, and the one aspired towards.
  3. Sketching- Sketching ideas helps me to generate a large number of possible logo design directions. Most of them will eventually be made redundant, but the point is to think laterally and not rule anything out in order to achieve the most effective logo design. I frequently mention sketching in blog posts and portfolio entries, and it’s a method also used by other design disciplines—web design, architecture etc.
  4. Prototyping and Conceptualising (See Step 5).
  5. Send to Client for Review – leave colour out until afterwards.
  6. Revise and Add Finishing Touches.
  7. Supply Files to Client and Provide Customer Service (an important and often overlooked step of the logo design process).

Information to collect:

  • Name of the service/product:
  • Any slogans to use?
  • Any specific color schemes in mind?
  • What are you trying to convey through the logo?

Thumbnail sketches

Design in illustrator / Photoshop

  • Experiment with the font which might work well for the logo e.g taxi business classic, businesslike, sans-serif, sporty, slick
  • Think of what exactly the product/service/site is all about
  • Google image search on taxis

Evolution of the design

  • SIMPLIFY. SIMPLIFY. SIMPLIFY. KISS method, (keep it simple, stupid)
  • Stay away from gradients, bevels, and dropshadows
  • Your logo is not your brand; it is -representing- your brand. McDonalds for example, does not have a the cheapest, fastest Hamburger in their logo – but everyone knows what the arched “M” means.

Aspect Ratios

  • The aspect ratio (the relationship between the height and width of a logo) is critical.
  • A logo design that is too tall and skinny, or too wide and short, is not visually pleasing, and you’ll end up with all sorts of layout issues when it comes to setting up your logo in artwork, especially when combined with other graphic elements (ie: business card, websites, etc).
  • A logo that is closer to a ‘golden mean’ (almost the aspect relationship of a business card) is much more pleasing and more adaptable to working in other artwork.
  • Square & circle logos are very strong visually due to their ‘square aspect ratio’ (see her for more on logo aspect ratios & logo footprints).
  • Strive to be ‘different’.
  • Color is a secondary factor in your logo.
  • The most important part of your logo project is the design itself.
  • Present to the client and make relevant changes.

Endnotes

  1. Wikipedia entry on Logo – Available at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logo – Accessed 2011

Featured image from: http://360imaginativedesigns.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/pm_logo_sketches.jpg

What is a logo?

A logo is a graphical element (ideogram, symbol, emblem, icon, sign) that, together with its logotype (a uniquely set and arranged typeface) form a trademark or commercial brand. Typically, a logo’s design is for immediate recognition.[1] The logo is one aspect of a company’s commercial brand, or economic or academic entity, and its shapes, colors, fonts, and images usually are different from others in a similar market. Logos are also used to identify organizations and other non-commercial entities. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logo)

A logo is not just a mark – it reflects a business’s commercial brand through the use of shape, fonts, colour, and / or images. A logo is for inspiring trust, recognition and admiration for a company or product and it is our job as designers to create an identity that will do its job.

Logo design process:

  1. The Design Brief

  2. Research and Brainstorming-Client competition, trends in the market, what sets the client apart, the history of the business, the future, the current brand, and the one aspired towards.

  3. Sketching-Sketching ideas helps me to generate a large number of possible directions. Most of them will eventually be made redundant, but the point is to think laterally and not rule anything out in order to achieve the most effective logo design. I frequently mention sketching in blog posts and portfolio entries, and it’s a method also used by other design disciplines—web design, architecture etc.

  4. Prototyping and Conceptualising (See Step 5)

  5. Send to Client for Review – leave colour out until afterwards

  6. Revise and Add Finishing Touches

  7. Supply Files to Client and Provide Customer Service

Information to collect:

Name of the service/product:

Any slogans to use?

Any specific color schemes in mind?

What are you trying to convey through the logo?

Any other specifics….

Thumbnail sketches

Design in illustrator / photoshop

  1. Experiment with the font which might work well for the logo

  2. e.g taxi business= classic, businesslike, probably sans-serif, sporty, slick

  3. think of what exactly the product/service/site is all about

  4. google image search on taxis

Evolution of the design

  1. SIMPLIFY. SIMPLIFY. SIMPLIFY. I can’t stress this enough. We all know the KISS method, (keep it simple, stupid) – but many times designers (and myself) forget to apply it to logo design.

  2. Other things I see are gradients, bevels, and dropshadows. These don’t transition well in enlargement and printing – stay away from these.

  3. Your logo will NOT tell your story. Your logo is NOT YOUR BRAND. When you create a logo for a company (whether that be for yourself or for another client), remember that your logo is not your brand; it is -representing- your brand. McDonalds for example, does not have a the cheapest, fastest Hamburger in their logo – but everyone knows what the arched “M” means.

  4. Aspect Ratios.

  5. The aspect ratio (the relationship between the height and width of a logo) is critical. A logo that is too tall and skinny, or too wide and short, is not visually pleasing, and you’ll end up with all sorts of layout issues when it comes to setting up your logo in artwork, especially when combined with other graphic elements (ie: business card, websites, etc). A logo that is closer to a ‘golden mean’ (almost the aspect relationship of a business card) is much more pleasing and more adaptable to working in other artwork. Square is pretty cool too – circle logos are very strong visually due to their ‘square aspect ratio’ (see her for more on logo aspect ratios & logo footprints).

  6. Strive to be ‘different’.

  7. You’d be surprised how many clients have asked that we design logos that are very similar to their competitors. Kinds misses the point, no? The idea of your own logo is just that – your own logo.

  8. Color is a secondary factor in your logo.

  9. The most important part of your logo project is the design itself. Oh sure, it’s nice to see your logo in the colors that you will eventually use, but in the initial stages of any design process the colors are of secondary importance. They can always be changed,or edited later. Now, having said that…

Present to the client and make relevant changes

0 0

Leave a comment ⇕

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *